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Greenfield Upper School Students: Magazine/Journal Articles

When to Use (and When NOT to Use) Magazines and Journal Articles

DO USE a magazine article as your information source. . .

  • . . . if you're looking for current information on your topic
  • . . . if you're looking for a quick overview of a complex topic
  • . . . if you're looking for a short, easy-to-understand, jargon-free summary of your topic (magazine articles may vary in length from less than a page to up to about 5 or 6 pages)

DO NOT USE a magazine article as your information source. . . 

  • . . . if you're looking for current research by experts in the field on your topic
  • . . . if you're looking for a broad, comprehensive treatment of your topic in great detail

DO USE a journal article as your information source. . .

  • . . . if you're looking for current research by experts in the field on your topic
  • . . . if you're focusing on a very narrow, in-depth aspect of your topic

DO NOT USE a journal article as your information source. . . 

  • . . . if you're looking for a broad, comprehensive treatment of your topic in great detail
  • . . . if you're looking for a quick overview of a complex topic
  • . . . if you're looking for a short, easy-to-understand, jargon-free summary of your topic (journal articles can be quite lengthy, running anywhere from 10 to 100 pages)

Use OneSearch to Begin Searching Across Many Databases for "Scholarly Articles"

(Because of subscriber restrictions, these tools will require an IB  or AP Barton login for off campus access.)

1)  To begin your search across many databases for scholarly, peer-reviewed articles, do a "OneSearch" (using the Summon tool) on the library's home page, and then use the results in the middle column, labeled "Scholarly Articles"  (to see more than those few listed in the column, click the blue button at the bottom of the article list in that column). 

OR
 

2)  Use the search box below to search for scholarly (peer-reviewed) full-text journal articles directly using Summon:

(Please note that in addition to publishing research articles [the reports of research], scholarly, peer-reviewed journals sometimes publish other kinds of articles, such as book reviews, editorials, and short news stories.  Research articles are usually distinguishable by a lengthy list of references at the end.)

 

Search Current Multi-Subject Databases for Journal Articles

Search the following general databases individually for current articles published in academic journals on many different topics.  (You will need to limit to "peer reviewed," "scholarly," or "refereed" to find only journal articles in these databases.)  

(Because of subscriber restrictions, these tools will require a Barton login for off campus access.)

Tips:

  • To limit to full-text articles, check the "full text" limit.
  •  See our Guide to the differences between Journal and Magazine articles.

Search Archival Multi-Subject Databases for Journal Articles

Search the following general databases individually for full-text archival (older) articles published in academic journals on many different topics (these databases do not contain current articles, they are always several years behind).  You will not need to limit to "peer reviewed," "scholarly," or "refereed" to find only journal articles, because these databases contain only journal articles.  

(Because of subscriber restrictions, these tools will require a Barton login for off campus access.)

Tips:

  • To limit to full-text articles, check the "full text" limit.
  •  See our Guide to the differences between Journal and Magazine articles.

 

Tips

Tips for Evaluating Articles for Relevance

To determine the relevance of a particular article quickly, do the following:

  • Skim the abstract (summary) of the article to help determine relevance.  (Hover over the hourglass icon in EBSCOhost databases to see it from the results list.)
  • Skim the introduction and the conclusion sections of the article to help determine relevance.  (Look at the full text of the article to see these sections.)
  • Skim the subject headings used to describe the article to help determine relevance.  (These are found in the results list and in the individual citation pages for each article.)

To Locate Databases by Subject or by Database Title

To find which databases cover specific topics (e.g., Business, Education, History, Psychology, etc.), or to find specific databases by title (e.g., JSTOR, ERIC, ABI-INFORM, etc.), click on the following link:

Tips:  

  • Select the subject for which you want to find resources/databases from the drop-down menu on the top left of the page.  The default is for "general" or "multi-subject" resources.
  • Once your subject is chosen, "recommended" database names will appear.  These are good to start with for that subject/discipline, and are accessible by clicking on the database name.
  • To browse by database title, in the "Find a Research Tool" area, click on the alphabetical letter that corresponds to the first word in the database title you want to search (e.g., "A" for "Academic Search Complete"), and then find that database name and click on it in the alphabetical list that is generated.
  • Still need help?  Try a Research Guide in the box to the right on this page!